Wednesday, 3 January 2018

Did Ireland Just Experience its First Islamist Attack? It's Probably Racist to Ask

On Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018, an eighteen year old Egyptian, randomly attacked members of the public in the town of Dundalk in the Republic of Ireland, leaving one person dead and two people injured. At the time of writing this piece, the Irish police have not yet established a motive for the attack. However, one line of inquiry being pursued is that it may be an act of terrorism. If it turns out to be an act of terrorism it will be the first Islamist attack on the island of Ireland and the first against a western country in 2018.


One of the things I wish to focus on in this piece is the nature and tone of public debate on this issue on social media that occurs in the aftermath of these kinds of random street attacks in western countries carried out by either recent immigrants from a Muslim majority country, or Muslim citizens of a western country. For some people, to focus in anyway on the fact that the attacker might be, or is a Muslim, or that he recently immigrated from a Muslim majority can only signify that the person highlighting this fact must be a racist who hates every brown and black skinned person in the middle east and beyond and opposes all immigration. For these people, Islamic extremism, if you will forgive the pun, really is a black and white issue, or a brown and white one if you will. They allow no room for nuance, or that the issue of Islamism is complicated and has nothing to do with race. Islamists themselves are not motivated by race, they eagerly accept white converts whilst slaughtering people from the same ethnic group just for being the wrong kind of Muslim, or a Christian, or gay, or an apostate who has left the faith. It is only pseudo-liberal western leftists who favour lax immigration controls, or completely open borders, and ethnic nationalists who oppose all immigration who have conflated Islamic extremism with the issue of race. For most western citizens, including many from ethnic minority backgrounds, our concerns regarding Islamic extremism are to do with values, not skin colour or ethnic origin.


However, for many people any focusing on the Islamic motivations of random street attacks are interpreted as a form of race hatred. All you have to do to be labelled a racist these days in the immediate aftermath of a middle eastern man driving over people in a western city, or an Afghani draped in an ISIS flag running through the streets stabbing people whilst shouting 'allahu akbar', is ask the following questions in this exact sequence:


A) Do you think that man who shouted 'death to the Kuffar' as he drove over those kids might have been an Islamic terrorist?

B) If so, there seems to be a pattern emerging over the past few years in the west with bearded men who I don't think are hipsters wanting to kill westerners, would you agree?

C) In that many Islamist attacks in the west in recent years were carried out by recent immigrants from Muslim majority countries, or by western citizens with roots in Muslim majority countries, do we need to examine how our immigration policies towards these countries may have contributed to the problem?


Drop those three questions in to the comments section of any mainstream media on-line publication or on a Facebook or Twitter thread with a left leaning bias and you won't have to wait too long before you are labelled a 'fascist' or called a 'white supremacist.' If you are a brown or black skinned westerner and you ask such questions, smug, left-leaning white people who love to display their anti-racist credentials, but still think they know better than you and wish you would know your place will be unaware of the irony of smearing you with the racist epithet, 'Uncle Tom' , because you refuse to adopt the political opinions they believe all black and brown people should have.


In the aftermath of the attack in Dundalk, I saw a comment on the Irish on-line paper theJournal.ie, which stated that white people stabbing each other rarely makes the news. The comment went on to insinuate that the attack was only in the news because the man may be a Muslim and is from the middle east. This exemplifies the self hatred that runs so deep with some western citizens that they believe the mere reporting of facts are racist. Besides, the comment is factually incorrect because murders and violent attacks, regardless of the race or ethnic background of the perpetrators are widely reported across both Ireland and Britain. What sets the attacks in Dundalk apart, like similiar attacks across Europe over the past few years, is the fact they were against random people and completely unprovoked and they almost always end up involving an Islamist extremist.


By importing large numbers of people from across the entire Muslim world in to Europe with very little regulation over the past few decades we got the best and the worst of what these countries had to offer. Yes, we got plenty of genuine secular cultural Muslims who barely follow their religion and if they do, they focus on the benign aspects and reject those parts of the Koran they don't agree with. Many of these people contribute positively to society. We also got some peaceful socially conservative Muslims who respect the law of the land and don't wish to impose their faith on anyone and who also oppose the Islamist agenda. There are also both Egyptian Coptic Christians living in the west and ex-Muslims who have fled persecution at the hands of Islamist groups like the Muslim Brotherhood who have a strong foothold in Ireland.



On the downside, we also got all of the pathologies that these countries have to offer, how could we have not? Now, we have an epidemic of  forced marriages in the UK, and what Trevor Phillips, the UK's former head of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission under Tony Blair's government called, 'a nation within a nation', with regards to how a significant portion of British Muslims hold values that are in direct conflict with the values of liberal democracy.  Not to mention the 23,000 Islamist extremists in the UK, of which the authorities only have the resources to monitor a limited number. Other western countries with significant Muslim populations have similar problems. As I have said in many articles before, it is not possible to have had a lax immigration system towards countries with high levels of extremism and illiberal views and not import these mindsets in to the west. I am aware that I often repeat these facts in some of my articles. This is intentional. The social cohesion of many European societies will experience further strains and tensions as the Muslim population is set to increase over the next few decades. If you think this is alarmist, then please, I invite you to do some research on social attitudes (I have provided several links in this article) in Muslim majority countries. Honestly examine the evidence and evaluate just how women, gays, atheists and members of minority religions including some minority Muslim sects are fairing in these societies. If western countries see an increase in their populations of people who oppose many of the freedoms of liberal democracy then there will be increased social tensions. It is inevitable.

Putting aside the threat from increasing levels of Islamism, we already see similar tears in the social fabric in the culture wars being played out on University campuses in the United States that have percolated in to the mainstream of western societies. The tedious and unrelenting focus on transgender issues being just one example. Here in the British Isles, basic liberal democratic freedoms, such as freedom of speech are coming under attack even from people within the media. Are we slowly sleepwalking towards a nightmare scenario in Europe in the coming decades, where the growing influence of Islamism coupled with that of illiberal post-modernism tears away at the very freedoms that it took centuries to slowly wrestle from monarchs and Christian theocrats? Did we live through the best of times only decades ago without realising it? I hope that I am wrong, but I fear that we may have well passed our best before date.




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